Categories: General
      Date: Feb  4, 2011
     Title: New publication on legal aid in New Brunswick

From left: Deborah Doherty, executive director, Public Legal Education and Information Service of New Brunswick; Marie-Claude Blais, minister of justice and consumer affairs as well as attorney general; and Barbara Hughes Campbell, commission chair.
A new booklet has been produced which explains the legal services provided by the New Brunswick Legal Aid Services Commission.

Entitled Legal Aid in New Brunswick: Providing legal help for people with low incomes, the booklet was produced by the Public Legal Education and Information Service of New Brunswick  in collaboration with the commission.

The booklet is being launched at the mid-winter meetings of the Canadian Bar Association, New Brunswick branch, being held in Fredericton from Feb. 4 to 5.

"Although legal aid is intended primarily to provide help for people with low incomes, some of our services are available to anyone who wishes to use them," said Robert Penney, chief operating officer of the commission. "This new resource provides information about the criminal and family law services offered by Legal Aid.  It also outlines the criteria that we use to determine eligibility for representation." 

The booklet is being distributed to Legal Aid offices, police and community agencies. It will also be shared with lawyers and libraries across the province. The booklet will be available on the websites of the commission and the Public Legal Education and Information Service of New Brunswick.

"Having a legal problem can be a frightening and confusing experience, especially if you feel that you cannot afford a lawyer,” said Deborah Doherty, executive director of the Public Legal Education and Information Service of New Brunswick. “This plain-language booklet answers some of the commonly asked questions about the types of legal aid services available and how and where to access them."

The booklet also provides information about other resources for persons with criminal or family law problems, such as the publications and self-help guides produced by the Public Legal Education and Information Service of New Brunswick.